Study – Boxing Headgear Ban Results In “Significantly Decreased” Head Injury Rate, More Cuts

Although the Amateur International Boxing Association’s recent ban of headgear in competition has been somewhat controversial, a recent study has found the ban has resulted in fewer head injuries for competitors.

The recent study, published in this month’s Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, the authors reviewed “stoppages due to blows to the head by comparing World Series Boxing (WSB), without head guards, to other AIBA competitions with head guards” and further examined “the last 3 world championships: 2009 and 2011 (with head guards) and 2013 (without head guards).“.

The results showed “the number of stoppages due to head blows was significantly decreased without head guards. The studies also showed that there was a notable increase in cuts.

The study is titled “Use of Head Guards in AIBA Tournaments – A Cross Sectional Observational Study” and can be purchased here.

The full abstract reads as follows –

Objective: This study looks at the changes in injuries after the implementation of a new rule by the International Boxing Association (AIBA) to remove head guards from its competitions.

Design: A cross-sectional observational study performed prospectively. This brief report examines the removal of head guards in 2 different ways. The first was to examine the stoppages due to blows to the head by comparing World Series Boxing (WSB), without head guards, to other AIBA competitions with head guards. Secondly, we examined the last 3 world championships: 2009 and 2011 (with head guards) and 2013 (without head guards).

Setting: World Series Boxing and AIBA world championship boxing.

Participants: Boxers from WSB and AIBA world championships.

Interventions: The information was recorded by ringside medical physicians.

Main Outcome Measures: Stoppages per 10 000 rounds; stoppages per 1000 hours.

Results: Both studies show that the number of stoppages due to head blows was significantly decreased without head guards. The studies also showed that there was a notable increase in cuts.

Conclusions: Removing head guards may reduce the already small risk of acute brain injury in amateur boxing.

Copyright (C) 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s